Sarah Palin is apparently Feminist

Just been reading an article from Jessica Valenti in Newsweek and had to post this. Quote from the article:
In much the same way Obama-supporting feminists were criticized, women who didn't back Palin were swiftly denounced as hypocrites by those on the right. Rick Santorum called Palin the "Clarence Thomas for feminists," blasting women who didn't support her. Janice Shaw Crouse of Concerned Women for America said, "Even feminists—who supposedly promote women's equality and the so-called 'women's rights' agenda—are questioning a female candidate's ability to get the job done." The criticism of women who failed to back Palin even indulged in sexism. Dennis Miller said that women who weren't behind Palin were simply jealous of the candidate's sex life, and Time magazine reporter Belinda Luscombe wrote that some women had a "hatred" for Palin simply because she was "too pretty." (My favorite, however, was Kevin Burke's argument in National Review that women who didn't support Palin were suffering from "post-abortion symptoms.") Palin even managed to divide some feminists. Elaine Lafferty—a former editor of Ms. magazine who had endorsed Clinton but then signed on as a consultant to the McCain campaign—condemned feminist leaders for "sink[ing] this low" and called feminism an "exclusionary club" for not welcoming Palin with open arms.

Or perhaps people didn't like her because of stuff like this:


Or that an actor knows more than she does about dinosaurs:


I'm not American so this isn't something that directly affected me. But apparently as women, if we get a female candidate, it is our duty - as women - to support them. No matter how ridiculous that particular woman might be, or how little she knows about politics. If Britney Spears decides she is running for president, all women must vote for her. Quite frankly, if you think that way then you can fuck off. I was too young to really understand the Thatcher years but looking back on it, I don't much like her. When white men had to choose between Al Gore and George W, were the younger ones told to vote for Al because he is younger than George? Or was it based on their height, build ... favourite colour? What about when British men are (likely) to be asked to choose between David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg? Support the same football team perhaps?

I feel I should also note how lovely Katie Couric was about the Sarah Palin interview when she appeared on David Letterman. She could have completed slated her - as most people were doing - but she was very polite.


I do not claim to know everything about feminism. In fact, the more I read about people's issues with feminism, the more I realise how much I have to learn. But the version (or brand or label or whatever) of feminism that I adhere to is about social justice. Not something I associate Sarah Palin with.

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Friday, 30 December 2011

Sarah Palin is apparently Feminist

Just been reading an article from Jessica Valenti in Newsweek and had to post this. Quote from the article:
In much the same way Obama-supporting feminists were criticized, women who didn't back Palin were swiftly denounced as hypocrites by those on the right. Rick Santorum called Palin the "Clarence Thomas for feminists," blasting women who didn't support her. Janice Shaw Crouse of Concerned Women for America said, "Even feminists—who supposedly promote women's equality and the so-called 'women's rights' agenda—are questioning a female candidate's ability to get the job done." The criticism of women who failed to back Palin even indulged in sexism. Dennis Miller said that women who weren't behind Palin were simply jealous of the candidate's sex life, and Time magazine reporter Belinda Luscombe wrote that some women had a "hatred" for Palin simply because she was "too pretty." (My favorite, however, was Kevin Burke's argument in National Review that women who didn't support Palin were suffering from "post-abortion symptoms.") Palin even managed to divide some feminists. Elaine Lafferty—a former editor of Ms. magazine who had endorsed Clinton but then signed on as a consultant to the McCain campaign—condemned feminist leaders for "sink[ing] this low" and called feminism an "exclusionary club" for not welcoming Palin with open arms.

Or perhaps people didn't like her because of stuff like this:


Or that an actor knows more than she does about dinosaurs:


I'm not American so this isn't something that directly affected me. But apparently as women, if we get a female candidate, it is our duty - as women - to support them. No matter how ridiculous that particular woman might be, or how little she knows about politics. If Britney Spears decides she is running for president, all women must vote for her. Quite frankly, if you think that way then you can fuck off. I was too young to really understand the Thatcher years but looking back on it, I don't much like her. When white men had to choose between Al Gore and George W, were the younger ones told to vote for Al because he is younger than George? Or was it based on their height, build ... favourite colour? What about when British men are (likely) to be asked to choose between David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg? Support the same football team perhaps?

I feel I should also note how lovely Katie Couric was about the Sarah Palin interview when she appeared on David Letterman. She could have completed slated her - as most people were doing - but she was very polite.


I do not claim to know everything about feminism. In fact, the more I read about people's issues with feminism, the more I realise how much I have to learn. But the version (or brand or label or whatever) of feminism that I adhere to is about social justice. Not something I associate Sarah Palin with.

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