And then there were three

A thoroughly boring day. Met Komal and Andrea at breakfast and said I wanted to catch up on work while they went shopping. Basically spent the entire day in the hotel room but didn't feel like I accomplished that much. Decided I should probably get some fresh air around 5pm so went for a walk to Starbucks. And paid £4 for a normal size coffee. The exchange rate is really bad for tourists at the moment.

Met Komal, Andrea and Hideyuki for a meeting at 6.30, then we went to a canteen style restaurant next door. Hideyuki complemented me on my "very Japanese" style eating when I picked up my rice bowl. Shortly followed by Komal leaving his chopsticks standing up in his food (big no-no - means 'death').

Said goodbye to Andrea because she is leaving in the early hours, and went to bed.

Quiet day, so a chance to write about some other 'Japan' stuff.

Bikes.

They're everywhere. Push bikes and scooters. On the road, the pavements, at road crossings, travelling in whichever direction they want. It was a bit strange at first, being so used to bike not being allowed on pavements, but I'm kinda used to it now. The bike riders do a pretty good job at avoiding pedestrians, and even when you do get in their way (like I did last night), they don't shout like they would in the UK! There are so many bikes that there are car parks for them (or bike parks if you prefer). And they're piled up outside shops. And none of them are locked.

The great thing is watching the Japanese riding along dead casual, one hand on the handlebar, one hand holding their umbrella.


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Saturday, 21 January 2012

And then there were three

A thoroughly boring day. Met Komal and Andrea at breakfast and said I wanted to catch up on work while they went shopping. Basically spent the entire day in the hotel room but didn't feel like I accomplished that much. Decided I should probably get some fresh air around 5pm so went for a walk to Starbucks. And paid £4 for a normal size coffee. The exchange rate is really bad for tourists at the moment.

Met Komal, Andrea and Hideyuki for a meeting at 6.30, then we went to a canteen style restaurant next door. Hideyuki complemented me on my "very Japanese" style eating when I picked up my rice bowl. Shortly followed by Komal leaving his chopsticks standing up in his food (big no-no - means 'death').

Said goodbye to Andrea because she is leaving in the early hours, and went to bed.

Quiet day, so a chance to write about some other 'Japan' stuff.

Bikes.

They're everywhere. Push bikes and scooters. On the road, the pavements, at road crossings, travelling in whichever direction they want. It was a bit strange at first, being so used to bike not being allowed on pavements, but I'm kinda used to it now. The bike riders do a pretty good job at avoiding pedestrians, and even when you do get in their way (like I did last night), they don't shout like they would in the UK! There are so many bikes that there are car parks for them (or bike parks if you prefer). And they're piled up outside shops. And none of them are locked.

The great thing is watching the Japanese riding along dead casual, one hand on the handlebar, one hand holding their umbrella.


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