First Time Farmer

Shame I didn't know about the Channel 4 series sooner - I could have been a part of it!

Me in my farmer outfit with my farmer vehicle!
Dad was a farmer and I grew up on the farm, but took very little interest in farming. If it wasn't baby lambs or calves, or having fun driving the tractor, I didn't care. I just liked my horses.

But this summer I had to learn a bit more because Dad was in so much pain that he couldn't do as much of the work. I had to learn how to operate the front loader on the tractor so I could move the water container around to fill the troughs, and also had to move and stack the round bales. And I drove the tractor on the roads for the first time ever, which was an experience. Middle of town and I just could not get it into 4th gear! And the indicators don't switch off automatically!

But now I have to learn lots of other stuff, because I have land to maintain. 'Farmer' might be a bit of a stretch for what I do, but there's livestock (horses), 20 acres of grazing to get haylage from; so there is real work to be done. And there's 40 acres of rented land, so I'm a landlady too!

I'm going to have to learn about chain harrowing and rolling, and the right conditions for cutting, turning and baling haylage. Thankfully we get someone else to come and do the baling and wrapping. There's also fences that need putting up and maintaining and probably other stuff that hasn't occurred to me yet. We're in a nitrogen restriction zone so I don't have to worry about fertiliser, and the land is really good anyway.

I also have to look after the horses, who are quite low maintenance for horses, but the conditions in the fields are making it a hard slog at the moment. And some of the horses don't really understand that when you walk into an electric fence, you should stop and go back, rather than carry on walking through it.

My Boys excited by the first grass they've had in weeks!
The Boys in the photo are a bit susceptible to laminitis, so they have to be on restricted grazing and get hay and concentrated feed. This photo was taken on Saturday when I extended their paddock (which had turned into a mud bath). They showed their appreciation for grass by cantering up and down and rolling in it.

The rest of the horses are totally low maintenance with regard to food: just hay and water in winter, and grass and water in summer. But they're the ones who don't understand fences so just bring other issues!

Aside from the mud baths the British weather has been presenting plenty of challenges so far. There's the frozen ground that the horses struggle to walk on, frozen water in troughs and frozen water pipes, and snow. The horses aren't hugely bothered by the cold, but it means I have to go round smashing ice and carrying water to make sure they've got all they need.

But the best challenge has to be the wind. For the past couple of days I've wondered if I was going to blow away while trying to sort their food. One of the dividing fences gets pushed down to about a foot from the ground, essentially making it useless. I have to play 'find the food bucket' every time I arrive because they've all blown into the hedge somewhere.

But my 'favourite' event occurred weeks ago. The wind was so strong it did this:

The field shelter. Sheltering the hedge.
It is basically still in one piece so I'm hoping it can be lowered down gently and still work. Not that it really matters because the horses didn't like it anyway!

I'm hoping to blog a bit of a mini-series of my adventures as a farmer, much like my travel blogs but with less travel and more stress no doubt.

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Thursday, 31 January 2013

First Time Farmer

Shame I didn't know about the Channel 4 series sooner - I could have been a part of it!

Me in my farmer outfit with my farmer vehicle!
Dad was a farmer and I grew up on the farm, but took very little interest in farming. If it wasn't baby lambs or calves, or having fun driving the tractor, I didn't care. I just liked my horses.

But this summer I had to learn a bit more because Dad was in so much pain that he couldn't do as much of the work. I had to learn how to operate the front loader on the tractor so I could move the water container around to fill the troughs, and also had to move and stack the round bales. And I drove the tractor on the roads for the first time ever, which was an experience. Middle of town and I just could not get it into 4th gear! And the indicators don't switch off automatically!

But now I have to learn lots of other stuff, because I have land to maintain. 'Farmer' might be a bit of a stretch for what I do, but there's livestock (horses), 20 acres of grazing to get haylage from; so there is real work to be done. And there's 40 acres of rented land, so I'm a landlady too!

I'm going to have to learn about chain harrowing and rolling, and the right conditions for cutting, turning and baling haylage. Thankfully we get someone else to come and do the baling and wrapping. There's also fences that need putting up and maintaining and probably other stuff that hasn't occurred to me yet. We're in a nitrogen restriction zone so I don't have to worry about fertiliser, and the land is really good anyway.

I also have to look after the horses, who are quite low maintenance for horses, but the conditions in the fields are making it a hard slog at the moment. And some of the horses don't really understand that when you walk into an electric fence, you should stop and go back, rather than carry on walking through it.

My Boys excited by the first grass they've had in weeks!
The Boys in the photo are a bit susceptible to laminitis, so they have to be on restricted grazing and get hay and concentrated feed. This photo was taken on Saturday when I extended their paddock (which had turned into a mud bath). They showed their appreciation for grass by cantering up and down and rolling in it.

The rest of the horses are totally low maintenance with regard to food: just hay and water in winter, and grass and water in summer. But they're the ones who don't understand fences so just bring other issues!

Aside from the mud baths the British weather has been presenting plenty of challenges so far. There's the frozen ground that the horses struggle to walk on, frozen water in troughs and frozen water pipes, and snow. The horses aren't hugely bothered by the cold, but it means I have to go round smashing ice and carrying water to make sure they've got all they need.

But the best challenge has to be the wind. For the past couple of days I've wondered if I was going to blow away while trying to sort their food. One of the dividing fences gets pushed down to about a foot from the ground, essentially making it useless. I have to play 'find the food bucket' every time I arrive because they've all blown into the hedge somewhere.

But my 'favourite' event occurred weeks ago. The wind was so strong it did this:

The field shelter. Sheltering the hedge.
It is basically still in one piece so I'm hoping it can be lowered down gently and still work. Not that it really matters because the horses didn't like it anyway!

I'm hoping to blog a bit of a mini-series of my adventures as a farmer, much like my travel blogs but with less travel and more stress no doubt.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

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